So you’re interested in starting a business in Louisiana? That’s awesome, fantastic, and exciting. And, as one client recently put it “it’s a lot more work than I thought!” She was right. Running a business is a lot of work. The first question most people have though is pretty simple: where do I start?

If you’ve gotten to the point that you want to start a business and you don’t know where to start, there’s plenty of resources out there. Fortunately for you, you just found one. My 17 Step Guide to Starting a Profitable, Successful Business is available now, for free.

The Guide covers a wide range of topics from choosing the best entity for your business to choosing, discussing trademarks and copyrights, how to hire employees, and what you need to do to register with the IRS.

And did I mention it’s free? Just signup for the newsletter and download it now.

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This month’s post at Silicon Bayou News discusses why you should keep that Louisiana corporation or non-profit corporation record book up to date. Head over to Silicon Bayou to read the post, and make sure you ask any questions in the comments.

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Contract and Pen

A good contract may save you from litigation down the line

If you read this blog regularly, you know I always blab on and on about why you should have agreements in writing. And you’ve read the horror stories. This week, I was approached by not one, but two potential client who had their agreements in writing, but faced problems because those agreements did not comply with Louisiana law.

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This morning I received a call from a small business owner who had negotiated to sell all her inventory to a buyer for $60,000. The parties agreed that payment would be made over several months. The buyer drove in from another state, picked up all the inventory in a truck, and drove back home. The seller hasn’t heard from her since.

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As a shareholder of a corporation, you’re not responsible for the management of direction of the corporation. You’re simply an investor, and you put your trust in the officers and directors of the corporation to make prudent choices for your investment. When the officers or directors make a mistake,  you may have rights under a derivative action.

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